Joshua Randall

Re-Aggregate Alerts from Previously Deleted Incidents

Blog Post created by Joshua Randall Employee on Sep 3, 2019

It often happens to me that while I am testing new alerts and incident aggregation rules, I find that the aggregation condition(s) I chose in my Incident Rule are not what I want.  While I could re-create the raw alerts from scratch, I wanted an easier method to tell the Respond engine to re-apply its aggregation rule policies on the alerts that already exist in the database.

 

To be clear, the Respond engine is always attempting to apply all active and valid Incident Rules against un-aggregated and un-affiliated alerts in the database -- that is, any alert that has not been previously aggregated into any incident can be automatically aggregated into an incident if an incident rule with matching conditions is changed/created.  But for previously aggregated alerts whose incidents have been deleted (leaving the alerts un-aggregated but previously-affiliated), the Respond engine will not attempt to re-aggregate them.

 

So my goal, then, was to get the Respond engine to include these previously-affiliated alerts in its aggregation attempts.  To achieve this, the alerts simply needed to be updated to remove their previously-affiliated status.  And to make it easy to change dozens or even hundreds of alerts at once, I wrote a simple shell script (attached to this blog and pasted below) to do it all for me.

 

#!/bin/bash
#
#grab the deploy_admin password
DEPLOY_PW=$(security-cli-client --get-config-prop --prop-hierarchy nw.security-client --prop-name platform.deployment.password --quiet)

#set a desired time range to query for alerts
#examples: "24 hours ago" or "14 days ago" or "4 weeks ago"
timeRange=$(date +%s%N -d "30 days ago" | cut -b1-13)

#identify primaryESA host
primaryESA=$(echo -e "use orchestration-server\ndb.host.find({installedServices:\"ESAPrimary\"},{hostname:1})" | mongo admin -u deploy_admin -p $DEPLOY_PW --quiet | grep -Po "hostname.*\"" | sed -e "s/hostname.\{5\}\|\"//g")

#change status on all alerts that were part of a deleted incident
#within the timerange from "REMOVED_FROM_INCIDENT" to "NORMALIZED"
echo -e "use respond-server\ndb.alert.update({\$and:[{status:\"REMOVED_FROM_INCIDENT\"},{\"originalHeaders.timestamp\":{\$gte:$timeRange}}]},{\$set:{status:\"NORMALIZED\"}},{multi:true})" | mongo admin -u deploy_admin -p $DEPLOY_PW --host $primaryESA --quiet

 

A couple notes on the script:

  • I used one extremely generic parameter (timestamp within last 30 days) to limit the database query and update operation (line 15)
    • you should feel free to modify the timeRange (line 8) to suit your needs
    • you should also feel free to (carefully) modify the database query to focus on specific alerts in your environment
      • for example, given the following raw alert:

 

...you could change line 15 and add:

echo -e "use respond-server\ndb.alert.update({\$and:[{status:\"REMOVED_FROM_INCIDENT\"},{\"originalHeaders.timestamp\":{\$gte:$timeRange}},{\"originalAlert.moduleName\":\"Alert with source and destination IP values\"}]},{\$set:{status:\"NORMALIZED\"}},{multi:true})" | mongo admin -u deploy_admin -p $DEPLOY_PW --host $primaryESA --quiet

 

...or:

echo -e "use respond-server\ndb.alert.update({\$and:[{status:\"REMOVED_FROM_INCIDENT\"},{\"originalHeaders.timestamp\":{\$gte:$timeRange}},{\"originalAlert.events.ip_src\":\"192.168.20.20\"}]},{\$set:{status:\"NORMALIZED\"}},{multi:true})" | mongo admin -u deploy_admin -p $DEPLOY_PW --host $primaryESA --quiet

 

...or:

echo -e "use respond-server\ndb.alert.update({\$and:[{status:\"REMOVED_FROM_INCIDENT\"},{\"originalHeaders.timestamp\":{\$gte:$timeRange}},{\"originalAlert.moduleName\":\"Alert with source and destination IP values\"},{\"originalAlert.events.ip_src\":\"192.168.20.20\"}]},{\$set:{status:\"NORMALIZED\"}},{multi:true})" | mongo admin -u deploy_admin -p $DEPLOY_PW --host $primaryESA --quiet

  • a successful run of the script will produce output like this, showing you how many alerts in the database were modified (3, in this case):

 

Of course, I recommend testing this (and most everything else) in a pre-prod or test NetWitness environment, if you have one.  And should you have any questions about what might be a good and/or valid database query, the Link community is always on hand to help (please have screenshots and/or specifics about your alerts ready...its hard to help without knowing details...  ).

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